JNT Developers Summer Exterior Checklist

The heat is on here in Texas, is your home ready?

Summer can be hard on your body…and your home. If you’re wondering what affects the summer heat can have on your roof, keep in mind that the temperature of your roof materials depends on the climate. A roof can become up to 50 degrees warmer than the temperature outside, making for a scolding hot surface. This causes the inside of your home to become even warmer and shingles to deteriorate more quickly than in the cooler seasons.

Maintaining your roof in the hot Texas summer is the key to keeping repair costs down and money in your wallet. So, to avoid any damage and keep your roof in shape this summer, we’ve put together a full proof summer exterior checklist:

Check your gutters: First and foremost, look for clogs. Summers can be hot, but they can also be rainy and windy. Clogged gutters can cause additional leaks and damage. Use a leaf blower or a pressure washer to clear them out. Check to see if they are loose or there are any apparent leaks while cleaning them.

Inspect your skylights: Take a good long look at your skylights and the areas around them. Make sure your seal is tight and weatherproof. If you spot a leak, do not try and repair it yourself as you could cause additional damage by not using the proper materials or sealing areas that are meant to take in air.

Check your shingles: Once you’ve followed proper roof safety measures and you’re in a good position, take a hard look at each and every shingle on your home. You want to look for any curling, discoloration, or deteriorating. Most importantly, make sure there are no visual pieces missing. If you find that your shingles are curling, repair them as soon as possible as curling could cause them to fall off during high winds, leaving gaps in your roof and the potential for leaks.

White Reflects Light: Just as you would wear a white shirt if you were out in the Texas heat to reflect the sun, your roof can too. Invest in cooling your roof to lower rooftop temperatures during a hot sunny day and maintain a cooler environment.

Cool roofs are made simply with a highly solar reflective type of paint, sheet covering, or even reflective tiles or shingles. Ask your JNT representative how to get started.

Call for your JNT inspection and tune up: So by now you’re probably thinking, “how on earth am I going to do all of that?” Well, not to worry, JNT Developers offer a complete roof inspection and tune up options (call for pricing). Simply call us at (XXX) XXX-XXXX or visit our website at jntdevelopers.com

Roof Tune Up Includes:

  • A complete inspection of your roof
  • Inspection for issues that could cause water infiltration
  • Minor resealing (if needed) around pipe collars, vents, chimney, and exhaust fans
  • Checking for any loose or missing shingles or nail pops
  • Checking for any interior leaks not detectable from the exterior of your home
  • A complete summary report

So you want to texture your ceiling

In our line of work at JNT Developers, there isn’t a lot that we don’t know how to do when it comes to construction. We handle everything from repairing Dallas roofs, home remodels to large commercial construction projects. One question that we get a lot is from people wondering, how to texture a ceiling on their own. If you don’t mind a little hard work you can texture a ceiling in no time.

https://www.bobvila.com/articles/how-to-texture-a-ceiling/How To: Texture a Ceiling – Bob Vila It all too easy to slap a coat of white paint on your ceiling and consider it done. But to really pull a room together, it ought to be stylishly topped off—and putting a textured effect on the ceiling is a great way to add impact to your décor. Another plus? Textured ceilings perfectly camouflage imperfections like cracks or evidence of water damage. There are a variety of techniques you can employ to create your texture of choice (way beyond the “popcorn” look popular in the 1970s). All it takes is a mixture of paint and drywall mud—and a little ingenuity. Read on for simple step-by-step guidance to texturing your ceiling, your way, without sending your budget through the roof.

MATERIALS AND TOOLS – Drop cloths – Painter’s tape – Ladder – Primer – Pre-mixed textured paint – Wall paint – Drywall mud

STEP 1 Since you’ll be working against gravity, you’ll want to protect your furniture, floors, and fixtures from splatters. Empty the room as much as possible, which will also give you space to move around. Cover remaining pieces of furniture and the entire floor with drop cloths. Next, take off any faceplates, vent covers, ceiling fans, and/or light fixtures. Finally, apply painter’s tape around the edges of the ceiling, right where it meets the wall, being careful to keep it stick-straight all the way across.

STEP 2 You might think that because textured paint is part drywall mud it will adhere to any surface, but for a quality job, you still want to prime first. This step will make application easier and give lasting results. Choose a primer close to the color you’ll be using to texture your ceiling—a dark primer for dark paint and a light primer for light paint. Cover the entire surface in a thin, consistent layer and let dry fully (consult the can’s drying time guidelines) before moving on.

STEP 3 Prep your product. If you’re looking for a subtle texture, you’ll get good results with pre-mixed textured paint. But if you’re aiming for more depth or special effects, mix your own by combining paint with drywall mud. The standard rule of thumb is one part drywall mud to 10 parts paint. Pour paint into a bucket, add drywall mud, and blend, aiming for the consistency of pancake or biscuit batter. Depending on the look you’re going for, you might want a somewhat thicker consistency. Do a small batch first to practice getting it just right.

STEP 4 It’s always wise to start in the least noticeable part of the ceiling when applying the texture—perhaps the darkest corner of the room, or the edge of the ceiling closest to the door. Position your ladder there and make sure you can work from a reasonable angle without arching backwards. The exact technique (and subsequent tools you’ll need) depends on your desired effect.

• For a subtle finish: Apply pre-mixed textured product as you would typically put on paint. Cut in at the edges first with a paintbrush. Then use an extended roller and paint tray, taking care to bring your roller as close to the edges as possible. To amp the look slightly, use a specialty roller with a texture of its own. Don’t be afraid to experiment; after all, if you don’t like the initial result, you can always switch gears and apply another coat.

• For a stucco finish: To mimic the look of stucco, you’ll need a damp sponge or cloth as well as a wide compound knife or, if you’ve chosen a thicker-than-average consistency for aesthetic reasons, a trowel. Working on one small section at a time, apply the mixture to the ceiling, and then dab a damp sponge or cloth into your work in a repetitive motion to create the texture you desire. Repeat this process around the room, one section at a time, being careful not to let the pattern become too uniform.

• For a popcorn finish: If you like this retro look, you’ll need to buy or rent a drywall texture sprayer. Purchase enough lightweight plastic sheeting to protect your walls from flying particles, securing it to the the perimeter of the room with painter’s tape and covering the walls like a floor-length curtain all the way around. Before spraying, choose the nozzle and air pressure setting that matches your desired result, and then follow its instructions as you move the sprayer across the ceiling. Again, allow your application to look as random as possible rather than aiming for a perfect pattern.

• For an artistic finish: Truly advanced DIYers may wish to add extra character by creating a Victorian style rose rose medallion around a central lighting fixture or ceiling fan. This dramatic effect is achieved by using drywall mud and an array of texturing combs (two or three should do the trick, anywhere from 3 to 10 inches in length apiece). Working in concentric circles, you’ll use the combs to apply drywall mud (without paint) in thick, even, decorative stripes to mimic the look of plaster. When completely dry, you’ll paint the entire ceiling. Just keep in mind that this project will require a steady hand and a solid sense of design, so study up on the process before giving it a shot.

Whichever technique you choose, the end result will lend extra punch to your space’s style. The array of colors and effects is endless, so have fun and aim for a look that captures the personality of the room and those who live in it.


Add a New Tree to Your Yard for Earth Day!

We, at JNT Developers of Dallas, want to remind you all that this weekend Saturday, April 22, is Earth Day! There are all sorts of ways to celebrate but perhaps the best way is to plant a tree in your yard!

http://www.bhg.com/gardening/trees-shrubs-vines/care/the-proper-way-to-plant-a-tree/The Proper Way to Plant a Tree There’s an old gardening axiom that says the key to growing a great plant is to put a 50-cent specimen in a $5 hole. It’s no lie. Get your money’s worth from your new tree in your backyard by planting it correctly and caring for it while it grows.

Once you understand the science of planting trees, you’ll have your own in no time. Digging a wide planting hole is the key to fast growth of your new tree. Recommendations often specify a hole twice as wide as the root ball; three times as wide is even better.

To prevent settling, the depth should be no more than the height of the root ball.

First, prepare a hole two to three times as wide as the root ball of your tree. Handle the root ball carefully to keep it intact while you place it in the hole.

Once it’s in, turn it so the best side of the tree is facing the direction you want. With burlapped root balls, cut the twine and remove the burlap (or at least push it to the bottom of the hole).

Backfill around the root ball, lightly packing the soil as you go. Frequently check the trunk to ensure that it’s straight. Use leftover soil as a berm to create a watering well.

Amending backfill with organic matter is an old practice. However, several studies have shown that it produces little benefit (as long as the existing soil is of reasonable quality), so many experts no longer recommend it. The most important factor, by far, is loose soil that new roots can easily grow into. That’s why a large planting hole is so vital.

Drive the stake through the root ball into the ground underneath. The stake should be tied loosely to the trunk; do not lash it tightly.

Large trees may need two or three stakes placed several feet from the trunk.

Water the tree soon after planting and every day for several weeks afterward. By that point, the roots will have begun to grow out into the surrounding soil, and you can begin to gradually reduce the frequency of watering.

Fertilizer is of marginal benefit at planting time, and can even be harmful. Wait until the following year, then provide a moderate dose of fertilizer.

A 3-inch layer of mulch around the base of the tree will keep weeds out and reduce water loss.

Tip: Newly planted trees should only be pruned to remove broken, dead, or diseased limbs. Otherwise, leave them be until after their first growing season. See more…


How Pet-Friendly Is Your Home?

Calling all you animal lovers out there! How pet-friendly is your home? At JNT Developers we have been roofing Dallas homes for a while now and had the pleasure of meeting a lot of your furry friends. We know how much you love your pet. Let’s be honest they’re part of the family.

If you want to give your four-legged friend a cozy home there are a few things you can do to your home that will keep them comfortable and keep your home looking good!

Pet-Friendly House Design – Bob Vila If you’re a pet lover, odds are that you care enough to add the few touches necessary to make your home your pet’s castle as well as yours. In fact, nearly 90% of pet owners say their dogs or cats are members of the family, according to a December 2007 Harris Interactive Poll. And considering that nearly two out of three Americans own a pet, that’s a lot of people willing to share their home with barking dogs and pouncing cats.

Here are some simple ways to move beyond the monogrammed food bowl and create the sleep spots, hangouts, and dining locales in your home that will pamper your four-legged friend and keep him or her safe. See more…