Don’t Forget, Mother’s Day is This Weekend!

We at JNT Developers, want to remind you that this weekend is Mother’s Day! If you completely forgot and still don’t have anything planned, don’t fret there is still time. There is nothing quite as bad as forgetting about the moms in your life on their day. They will likely not let you forget it for a long time. Check out some of the fun ideas below for Mother’s Day ideas in Dallas.

https://www.dmagazine.com/arts-entertainment/2017/05/things-to-do-for-mothers-day-in-dallas/Things To Do For Mother’s Day in Dallas – D Magazine After brunch, of course.

Eat. Drink. Whether you’re making time for brunch, dinner, or some kind of all-day feast, our separate guide to where to dine for Mother’s Day has you covered.

The Women’s Chorus of Dallas performs a program of “Spring Song” at Texas Discovery Gardens at Fair Park on Sunday. The show concludes with a live butterfly release. We imagine the overall effect is about as magical as it sounds.

The Swiss Avenue Mother’s Day Home Tour is both Saturday and Sunday. Along with the opportunity to poke around seven of the city’s most historic and beautiful early 20th century homes, you can expect carriage rides, vintage cars, and yes, brunch — with a reservation.

Bring your mom to see the verifiably hilarious comics Dean Lewis and Linda Stogner at the Backdoor Comedy Club at the Doubletree Hotel. She’ll get a box of chocolates, a ticket for a later show, and some laughs out of the deal.

On Sunday, those jokesters at the Alamo Drafthouse in Richardson are showing Psycho, that timeless tale of a son’s love for his mother. For another unhealthy familial portrait, the Alamo in the Cedars is screening Mommie Dearest. For more earnest Mother’s Day fare, the Richardson theater also has The Sound of Music, while the Cedars has Breakfast at Tiffany’s. And brunch.

In Electra, a brother and sister plot revenge on their stepfather and mother for her role in the death of their father, Agamemnon. (Mom was understandably mad that Dad burned another daughter for favorable winds to Troy.) Who among us has not sworn bloody vengeance on their mother after she started seeing a new guy? This heartwarming family drama from Sophocles is presented by the Tony Award winning Dallas Theater Center with some innovative staging outside in Annette Strauss Square. Performances are throughout the weekend. read more at dmagazine.com

 

Have you had your annual roof inspection?

Your roof is one of the most important parts of your home. It protects everything else and without it, you are basically camping. Since this is one of the most important parts of your home it makes sense that you should take care of it. Preemptive maintenance can save you a lot of money and time in the long run. At JNT Developers we are happy to handle your Dallas roofing needs and inspect your roof.

https://www.bobvila.com/articles/roof-inspections/?#.WRSymeUrLIURoof Inspections – All You Need to Know – Bob Vila Your home’s roof is its first line of defense against storms and extreme weather, be it a foot or more of snow dropping from the sky overnight or high winds that tear through the town. When homeowners place blind faith in their roof and neglect it completely until the first sign of a leak appears in the ceiling, they could already be facing much larger problems—unwanted structural issues, mold growth, or damaged insulation, for starters. Spare yourself a headache down the road by having your roof periodically inspected.

When to Schedule Roof Inspections After a hailstorm or other significant weather event, most homeowners recognize the need for a thorough roof inspection to determine whether their roof suffered damage. But that shouldn’t be the only time you consider your roof’s health.

Perhaps the most vital time of year to have your roof inspected is the fall, before the cold of winter sets in. Timing is key. Frigid temperatures can compromise the success of new roof installations and such repairs as shingle replacement because new shingles can’t seal down properly when it’s too cold outside. Moreover, attempting repairs on icy roofs can be treacherous, so roof problems uncovered too late in the season may have to wait until spring to be fixed. Another argument for a fall inspection is the fact that certain roof repairs should be initiated in the fall so they can be completed the next spring—for example, treatment for moss and lichen. The solutions used for either of these invaders can require an extended amount of time to work, sometimes up to 180 days. If moss or lichen are discovered during a fall roof inspection, there’s still a chance to get at them before cold weather sets in. Then, the treatment can be working during those long winter months, and the dead lichen can be swept or rinsed off in the spring.

Homeowner Inspections vs. Professional Inspections Most homeowners can spot obvious roof problems, such as missing or flapping shingles, without climbing on the roof. Other types of damage, however, are not as visible to the untrained eye, which is why it’s important to get a professional opinion. If your roof is relatively new (less than five years old), shows no signs of interior leaks, and hasn’t been exposed to major weather events since the last time it was inspected, you can probably get by with a visual inspection from the ground and a quick check for leaks in your attic. In any other case, however, a comprehensive roof inspection should be completed by a roofing professional who knows what to look for.

For seasonal roof inspections, especially if your roof is more than 10 years old, call a reputable roofing contractor to come out and take a look. If you’re going into a roof inspection thinking that your roof has been damaged in some way, call your insurance company—they might cover the cost of repairs. Your agent will arrange for a qualified roof inspector to examine the roof and make a determination.

What to Expect from Professional Roof Inspections A roof inspector will be looking for leaks, unusual wear and tear, damage caused by windblown debris, organic growth issues, and problems that may have occurred during shingle installation or subsequent repairs. Ultimately, a roof inspection gets broken into four facets: structure, materials, interiors, and workmanship.

• Structural Inspection: The inspector will check for uneven roof planes and signs of sagging, in addition to examining the condition of the soffit, fascia, and gutter system. Masonry chimneys should be inspected at this time for cracks, crumbling grout, and damage to chimney caps. The inspector may also check the venting in your attic; improper venting can lead to heat and moisture buildup that reduces roof life and increases the risk of ice dams forming at the roof’s edge.

• Material Inspection: Here, the inspector will be looking for loose, missing, or curling shingles; stains; moss; rust; and missing flashing or fasteners. Shingle aggregate that has settled in roof valleys or on the ground at the bottom of gutter downspouts is a sign that the roof could be near the end of its useful life. The inspector will also check the rubber boots and seals around vent pipes, looking for gaps or deterioration.

• Interior Inspection: Because roof leaks ultimately damage your home, the inspector will check interior ceilings, the attic, and interior walls for water stains, mold, rot, and other signs that water is making its way into your house.

• Workmanship Inspection: A thorough inspector will examine your roof for problems in workmanship that could increase the risks of leaks or other roof damage in the future. Incorrect flashing around roof penetrations—including vent pipes, skylights, and chimneys—would all be red flags.

Roofing Analysis After the inspection, you’ll receive a detailed report about the condition of your roof and what repairs, if any, are necessary to keep it in good shape. If repairs are necessary, schedule them as soon as possible—before the snow flies, if you can. That way, when snow blankets the neighborhood, you can be confident that your roof is in good shape.

 

So you want to texture your ceiling

In our line of work at JNT Developers, there isn’t a lot that we don’t know how to do when it comes to construction. We handle everything from repairing Dallas roofs, home remodels to large commercial construction projects. One question that we get a lot is from people wondering, how to texture a ceiling on their own. If you don’t mind a little hard work you can texture a ceiling in no time.

https://www.bobvila.com/articles/how-to-texture-a-ceiling/How To: Texture a Ceiling – Bob Vila It all too easy to slap a coat of white paint on your ceiling and consider it done. But to really pull a room together, it ought to be stylishly topped off—and putting a textured effect on the ceiling is a great way to add impact to your décor. Another plus? Textured ceilings perfectly camouflage imperfections like cracks or evidence of water damage. There are a variety of techniques you can employ to create your texture of choice (way beyond the “popcorn” look popular in the 1970s). All it takes is a mixture of paint and drywall mud—and a little ingenuity. Read on for simple step-by-step guidance to texturing your ceiling, your way, without sending your budget through the roof.

MATERIALS AND TOOLS – Drop cloths – Painter’s tape – Ladder – Primer – Pre-mixed textured paint – Wall paint – Drywall mud

STEP 1 Since you’ll be working against gravity, you’ll want to protect your furniture, floors, and fixtures from splatters. Empty the room as much as possible, which will also give you space to move around. Cover remaining pieces of furniture and the entire floor with drop cloths. Next, take off any faceplates, vent covers, ceiling fans, and/or light fixtures. Finally, apply painter’s tape around the edges of the ceiling, right where it meets the wall, being careful to keep it stick-straight all the way across.

STEP 2 You might think that because textured paint is part drywall mud it will adhere to any surface, but for a quality job, you still want to prime first. This step will make application easier and give lasting results. Choose a primer close to the color you’ll be using to texture your ceiling—a dark primer for dark paint and a light primer for light paint. Cover the entire surface in a thin, consistent layer and let dry fully (consult the can’s drying time guidelines) before moving on.

STEP 3 Prep your product. If you’re looking for a subtle texture, you’ll get good results with pre-mixed textured paint. But if you’re aiming for more depth or special effects, mix your own by combining paint with drywall mud. The standard rule of thumb is one part drywall mud to 10 parts paint. Pour paint into a bucket, add drywall mud, and blend, aiming for the consistency of pancake or biscuit batter. Depending on the look you’re going for, you might want a somewhat thicker consistency. Do a small batch first to practice getting it just right.

STEP 4 It’s always wise to start in the least noticeable part of the ceiling when applying the texture—perhaps the darkest corner of the room, or the edge of the ceiling closest to the door. Position your ladder there and make sure you can work from a reasonable angle without arching backwards. The exact technique (and subsequent tools you’ll need) depends on your desired effect.

• For a subtle finish: Apply pre-mixed textured product as you would typically put on paint. Cut in at the edges first with a paintbrush. Then use an extended roller and paint tray, taking care to bring your roller as close to the edges as possible. To amp the look slightly, use a specialty roller with a texture of its own. Don’t be afraid to experiment; after all, if you don’t like the initial result, you can always switch gears and apply another coat.

• For a stucco finish: To mimic the look of stucco, you’ll need a damp sponge or cloth as well as a wide compound knife or, if you’ve chosen a thicker-than-average consistency for aesthetic reasons, a trowel. Working on one small section at a time, apply the mixture to the ceiling, and then dab a damp sponge or cloth into your work in a repetitive motion to create the texture you desire. Repeat this process around the room, one section at a time, being careful not to let the pattern become too uniform.

• For a popcorn finish: If you like this retro look, you’ll need to buy or rent a drywall texture sprayer. Purchase enough lightweight plastic sheeting to protect your walls from flying particles, securing it to the the perimeter of the room with painter’s tape and covering the walls like a floor-length curtain all the way around. Before spraying, choose the nozzle and air pressure setting that matches your desired result, and then follow its instructions as you move the sprayer across the ceiling. Again, allow your application to look as random as possible rather than aiming for a perfect pattern.

• For an artistic finish: Truly advanced DIYers may wish to add extra character by creating a Victorian style rose rose medallion around a central lighting fixture or ceiling fan. This dramatic effect is achieved by using drywall mud and an array of texturing combs (two or three should do the trick, anywhere from 3 to 10 inches in length apiece). Working in concentric circles, you’ll use the combs to apply drywall mud (without paint) in thick, even, decorative stripes to mimic the look of plaster. When completely dry, you’ll paint the entire ceiling. Just keep in mind that this project will require a steady hand and a solid sense of design, so study up on the process before giving it a shot.

Whichever technique you choose, the end result will lend extra punch to your space’s style. The array of colors and effects is endless, so have fun and aim for a look that captures the personality of the room and those who live in it.

 

Are you looking for some clever remodeling ideas?

You spend a great deal of your time at your house so it makes sense that it is a place that you really love. There are a lot of ways that you can make a home fit your needs and it doesn’t mean you need a new home. At JNT Developers we can help you with your Dallas roofing and home remodeling needs to give you a home you love. Check out some of our favorite remodel galleries below and get inspired.

http://www.hgtv.com/design/decorating/design-101/before-and-after-inspiration-remodeling-ideas-from-rate-my-space-picturesBefore-and-After Inspiration: Remodeling Ideas From HGTV Fans | HGTV HGTV fan njhaus had more in mind for this modern kitchen remodel than fancy appliances. “The kitchen was designed with my husband in mind, who uses a wheelchair. We lowered the counters to make it easier for him to reach the cooktop. The lower counter at the island is table height so he can wheel right in. The features are integrated seamlessly (without) being obvious or less functional for everyone else.”

 

https://www.buzzfeed.com/peggy/insanely-clever-remodeling-ideas-for-your-new-home?utm_term=.qvVRqqkd4#.bp3QEE4LY31 Insanely Clever Remodeling Ideas For Your New Home -BuzzFeed

buzzfeed.com

http://www.countryliving.com/remodeling-renovation/home-makeovers/g1233/kitchen-makeovers/?slide=222 Kitchen Makeover Before & Afters – Kitchen Remodeling Ideas You’ll want to makeover your own kitchen once you see these jaw-dropping before-and-after pictures.

The counters and cabinets in this kitchen needed a chic update, but the vintage stove had too much charm and potential to get rid of.

The homeowner kept the kitchen’s old Chambers stove and cabinets—now improved with new fronts and a coat of Benjamin Moore’s Patriotic White—but jettisoned the Formica counters and dark backsplash in favor of marble and white subway tiles.